SIK

The salt-inducible kinases (SIKs) are a family of related serine-threonine kinases. In cultured adrenocortical cells, SIK1 is rapidly but transiently induced by adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) treatment, suggesting that it contributes to ACTH-mediated induction of steroidogenic enzymes. However, ACTH treatment of Y1 mouse adrenocortical cells stimulates a rapid translocation of SIK1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, and SIK1 represses the transcription of a steroidogenic enzyme by inhibiting the action of cAMP-responsive elements in the promoter. These studies suggest that SIK1 has a role in the fine tuning of steroidogenic enzyme production during the initial phase of steroidogenesis. SIK2 is found in adipocytes and phosphorylates a specific serine residue in insulin receptor substrate-1. This finding, along with the fact that its expression is raised in the white adipose tissue of mice with type 2 diabetes mellitus, suggests that SIK2 might be involved in metabolic regulation in adipose tissue.[1]


[1] M. Okamoto et al. Salt-inducible kinase in steroidogenesis and adipogenesis. Trends Endocrinol Metab. 2004 Jan-Feb;15(1):21-6.

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Axon ID Name Description From price
3041 ARN 3236 Potent, selective, ATP-competitive, and orally available inhibitor of SIK2 €95.00

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