EAAT

Glutamate transporters control the glutamate homeostasis in the central nervous system. Until now, five subtypes of high-affinity glutamate transporters (excitatory amino acid transporters, EAATs 1–5) have been identified that belong to the solute carrier 1 (SLC1) family of transmembrane proteins. These EAATs are secondary-active transporters, taking up glutamate into the cell against a substantial concentration gradient. EAAT1 and EAAT2 are predominantly but not exclusively expressed in glial cells; for example, EAAT2 is also expressed in mammalian retina[1] and the most abundant glutamate transporter found in the brain and, by some estimates, accounts for ~90% of the total glutamate uptake in the brain[2].


[1] T. Rauen et al. Structural and functional dynamics of Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters (EAAT). AIMS Mol. Science 2014, 1, 99-125.
[2] C.B. Divito et al. Excitatory amino acid transporters: roles in glutamatergic neurotransmission. Neurochem Int. 2014 Jul;73:172-80.

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Axon ID Name Description From price
2260 LDN 212320 Activator of EAAT2 translation; neuroprotectant €90.00
2427 TBOA ammonia salt, L- Very potent blocker of EAAT1–3 €135.00

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