RT

Reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs) are a class of antiretroviral drugs used to treat HIV infection and AIDS. RTIs inhibit activity of reverse transcriptase, a viral DNA polymerase that is required for replication of HIV and other retroviruses. Three forms of RTIs are known, of which nucleoside- and nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs and NtRTIs respectively) essentially show similar modes of action, while non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors have a completely different mode of action. NNRTIs block reverse transcriptase by binding at a different site on the enzyme, compared to NRTIs and NtRTIs. NNRTIs are not incorporated into the viral DNA but instead inhibit the movement of protein domains of reverse transcriptase that are needed to carry out the process of DNA synthesis. NNRTIs are therefore classified as non-competitive inhibitors of reverse transcriptase[1].


[1] L.J. Scott, C.M. Perry. Delavirdine: a review of its use in HIV infection. Drugs. 2000, 60, 1411-1444.

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Axon ID Name Description From price
2301 BIBR 1532 Potent and selective telomerase inhibitor inducing senescence in human cancer cells. €70.00
1534 Dapivirine NNRT inhibitor €95.00
1815 Delavirdine NNRT inhibitor (HIV-1) €90.00
2208 Gallic acid Multi-affinity drug. Antioxidant. €50.00

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